Annotated Bibliography Sample Paper

The Environmental Impact of Fast-Fashion on Water Resources

Calamari, Sage, and Karen H. Hyllegard. “An Exploration of Designers’ Perspectives on Human Health and Environmental Impacts of Interior Textiles.” Textiles and Clothing Sustainability, vol. 2, no. 1, 2016, pp. 1-16.

Summary

The Fast-Fashion industry is responsible for a wide range of shortcomings that affect the environment because of the deposits that are dumped on rivers, among other natural resources. The research explores the measures that have been embraced by textile companies to control environmental effects. Findings indicate that designers are now more conscious of their impact on the environment.

Evaluation

Given the changing roles of individuals, corporations in the textile industry should be held to account for their actions that lead to the degradation of the environment. The study demonstrates techniques that designers have embraced to control their ability to degrade the environment. Besides, the research findings enhance the cognitive functions of individuals regarding the textile’s product life cycle.

Reflection

Sharing this information with the public exposes them to an enabling environment where they can hold textile corporations to account for their misgivings. Environmental degradation and effects such as global warming have contributed to the inability of individuals to discover their potential. I believe reminding corporations about their role in protecting the environment is essential.

Iran, Samira, and Ulf Schrader. “Collaborative Fashion Consumption and its Environmental Effects.” Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, vol. 21, no. 4, 2017, pp. 468-482

Summary

Sustainable clothing in the world is an aspect that should be used to regulate the enthusiastic nature of American consumers and other fashion enthusiasts in the world. Through collaborative fashion consumption, the study highlights various techniques that can be deployed across the globe to hold textile companies to account for their actions, which endanger the environment.

Evaluation

By focusing on collaborative consumption, the paper delves into approaches that can be used to encourage sustainable clothing, which mitigates the environmental effects caused by textile corporations. Highlighting the strategies that are commonly used in the Fast-Fashion demonstrates the measures, which should be embraced to overcome the challenges affecting individuals in their surroundings.

Reflection

I believe consumer tactics should be monitored and discouraged because of their impact on the environment. Analyzing the approaches used by textile corporations to improve their interactions with individuals proves a particular aspect that focuses on solving issues that interfere with the viability of natural resources. However, research should be directed towards the changing environment to ascertain the role of various textile activities around the globe. 

Kozlowski, Anika, Cory Searcy, and Michal Bardecki. “Corporate Sustainability Reporting in the Apparel Industry.” International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 64, no. 3, 2015, pp. 377-397.

Summary

Sustainability reports indicate the measures put in place by corporates to avail certain services without interfering with the lifestyles of individuals. Although the global population is tasked with the mandate of aligning their interests with textile corporations, many companies alter their reports to suit the public agenda. Consistency should be seen across different sustainability reports because of their impact on the environment.

Evaluation

Indicators of change are captured by the measures taken by corporations to resolve a pressing need affecting individuals in their environment. However, many sustainability reports lack consistency because of their approaches that interfere with the interactions between an organization and consumers. 

Reflection

I believe the lack of consistency in these reports is caused by the inability of corporations to embrace honesty in their interactions with various stakeholders. By understanding the elements that influence the focus of individuals on the environment, textile companies should be held to account for the massive damage they initiate through their acts of irresponsibility.

Reimers, Vaughan, Bryce Magnuson, and Fred Chao. “The Academic Conceptualisation of Ethical Clothing.” Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, vol. 20, no. 4, 2016, pp. 383-399.

Summary

Ethical clothing is a topical issue that influences the decisions made by individuals regarding their interaction with textile corporations. However, consumer perceptions of ethical clothing were found to revolve around animal welfare, environmental responsibility, slow fashion uptake, and employee welfare. Incorporating these aspects into ethical clothing has an impact on the actual sales recorded by textile corporations. By engaging consumers, the study evaluated the cause of the dwindling sales experienced by textile corporations after introducing the concept in the business environment. Attitude-behavior gaps were used to examine the aspects that influence purchasing decisions in the corporate world.  

Evaluation

The study explores the impact of the academic definition of ethical clothing and how it influences the perceptions of individuals towards the environmental aspect. The academic description of ethical clothing has a significant impact on the measures that can be introduced in the world today to focus on a wide range of aspects that influence the process of making decisions in the world today. While consumers believe ethical clothing to be tied to four attributes, the academic definition imposes inevitable distractions that influence the purchasing power of consumers. By highlighting the negligence of textile corporations, the academic definition of the practice is tied to certain aspects that lower the sales recorded by companies. 

Patwa, Nitin, and A. Seetharaman. “Redesigning Fashion Industry: A Transformational Circular Approach.” The Journal of Applied Business and Economics, vol. 21, no. 8, 2019, pp. 92-105.

Summary

After the oil industry, the Fast-Fashion business environment is the most polluting in the world, exposing many living orgasms to risks that influence their survival rates in their habitats. Importantly, textile companies have acknowledged their acts of irresponsibility through sustainability reports that account for the deposition of harmful materials into natural resources. While many people might wish to hold these corporations to account for their actions, this study highlights the slow response by various government agencies that are supposed to protect the environment. Reusing and recycling are recommended because of their ability to heighten the measures undertaken by the textile corporations.

Evaluation

The study evaluates three aspects that it believes can be benevolent if used to protect the environment in the textile industry. Firstly, identifying the knowledge and interests of suppliers, individuals encounter a series of problems that define the measures that should be undertaken by the corporations to respond to their acts of irresponsibility. Secondly, market competitiveness should not trigger irresponsibility among corporations because of their impact on the environment. Thirdly, sustainable operational efficiency should guide corporations to identify the measures that should be used to control pollution.

Deschamps, Thalía C., Bruce Carnie, and Ningtao Mao. “Public Consciousness and Willingness to Embrace Ethical Consumption of Textile Products in Mexico.” Textiles and Clothing Sustainability, vol. 2, no. 1, 2016, pp. 1-16.

Summary

Many economies around the world have recorded an increase in the willingness of consumers to embrace ethical behaviors that influence their purchasing power towards certain commodities in the business environment. The ethical consumption of textile products in the region has contributed to the realization of various objectives that influence the decisions of individuals towards environmental conservation. In their part, consumers determine the measures that should be used by corporations if they are willing to embrace the standards that seek to protect the environment. 

Reflection

I believe ethical clothing should be guided by the need to protect the environment through compelling textile companies to embrace measures that influence their decisions to overcome environmental degradation. Pending the approval of finished textile products by the consumer market, corporations should be held to account by the public because of the impact of their actions. Understanding the challenges affecting individuals poses a threat to human existence because of the unlimited contribution from corporations that deposit harmful substances to natural resources.

Boström, Magnus, and Michele Micheletti. “Introducing the Sustainability Challenge of Textiles and Clothing: Journal of Consumer Policy.” Journal of Consumer Policy, vol. 39, no. 4, 2016, pp. 367-375

Summary

While textile corporations are supposed to protect the environment, they recommend sophisticated measures that cannot be used to accomplish this important milestone. Due to the uncertainty of even fulfilling these measures, they get away with their acts of irresponsibility that exposes individuals to a wide range of health risks. Likewise, increasing global competition for Fast-Fashion products has compelled large corporations to reduce their costs of production by outsourcing in developing countries, which lack a defined environmental conservation plan.

Reflection

I believe governments around the world should boycott the textile products from corporations that fail to recognize their role in creating problems affecting individuals in their immediate environment. By reviewing global policies on textile operations, large corporations in the industry will have no option other than to enforce compliance even in their third-party partnerships in developing countries. Making it impossible for non-compliant operations will influence the nature of outcomes in the global environment. 

Works Cited

Boström, Magnus, and Michele Micheletti. “Introducing the Sustainability Challenge of Textiles and Clothing: Journal of Consumer Policy.” Journal of Consumer Policy, vol. 39, no. 4, 2016, pp. 367-375

Calamari, Sage, and Karen H. Hyllegard. “An Exploration of Designers’ Perspectives on Human Health and Environmental Impacts of Interior Textiles.” Textiles and Clothing Sustainability, vol. 2, no. 1, 2016, pp. 1-16.

Deschamps, Thalía C., Bruce Carnie, and Ningtao Mao. “Public Consciousness and Willingness to Embrace Ethical Consumption of Textile Products in Mexico.” Textiles and Clothing Sustainability, vol. 2, no. 1, 2016, pp. 1-16.

Iran, Samira, and Ulf Schrader. “Collaborative Fashion Consumption and its Environmental Effects.” Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, vol. 21, no. 4, 2017, pp. 468-482.

Kozlowski, Anika, Cory Searcy, and Michal Bardecki. “Corporate Sustainability Reporting in the Apparel Industry.” International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 64, no. 3, 2015, pp. 377-397.

Patwa, Nitin, and A. Seetharaman. “Redesigning Fashion Industry: A Transformational Circular Approach.” The Journal of Applied Business and Economics, vol. 21, no. 8, 2019, pp. 92-105.

Reimers, Vaughan, Bryce Magnuson, and Fred Chao. “The Academic Conceptualisation of Ethical Clothing.” Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, vol. 20, no. 4, 2016, pp. 383-399.

Grab A 14% Discount on This Paper
Pages (550 words)
Approximate price: -
Paper format
  • 275 words per page
  • 12 pt Arial/Times New Roman
  • Double line spacing
  • Any citation style (APA, MLA, Chicago/Turabian, Harvard)

Try it now!

Grab A 14% Discount on This Paper

Total price:
$0.00

How it works?

Follow these simple steps to get your paper done

Place your order

Fill in the order form and provide all details of your assignment.

Proceed with the payment

Choose the payment system that suits you most.

Receive the final file

Once your paper is ready, we will email it to you.